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Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville)New production

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This listing is in the past
Theater WinterthurTheaterstrasse 4 - 6, Zürich, Switzerland
May 15 19:30, May 17 19:30, May 19 14:30, May 22 19:30, May 25 19:30
Performers
Zurich Opera
Antonino FoglianiConductor
Johannes PölzgutterDirector
Nikolaus WebernSet Designer
Janina AmmonCostume Designer
Sinead O'KellySopranoRosina
Leonardo SánchezTenorCount Almaviva
Dean MurphyBaritoneFigaro
Richard WalsheBassDr Bartolo
Justyna BlujSopranoBerta
Thomas ErlankTenorAmbrogio
Wojciech RasiakBassDon Basilio
Kim Jungrae NoahBaritoneFiorello
Musikkollegium Winterthur
Zusatzchor der Oper Zürich

A well-known story, told anew: the International Opera Studio is to tackle Rossini’s Barber of Seville. The figure of the busybody barber for all situations, invented by the comic playwright Pierre Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais, provided subject matter not only for an entire trilogy of comedies, but also for several operas. The first part, Le Barbier de Séville, had already been very successfully set to music as early as 1782. Thirty years later, Rossini’s version easily put that success in the shade. With Le Nozze di Figaro, Mozart had opted for the middle part of the comic trilogy, which perhaps holds the most revolutionary potential. Yet with his Figaro in Il barbiere di Siviglia, Rossini also succeeded in creating a larger-than-life figure with a wonderfully irreverent temperament, who has long been a permanent fixture on the operatic stage. Known from the commedia dell’arte, the figures come together in a sophisticated intrigue: the mercenary (or genuinely enamoured?) old man; Dottor Bartolo, his scheming accomplice; the music teacher Basilio; Bartolo’s young and beautiful, but above all wealthy ward, Rosina, whom Bartolo intends to marry; Rosina’s secret lover, Lindoro alias Count Almaviva; and the barber Figaro, who against all the odds helps the lovers to have their happy end. The Austrian director Johannes Pölzgutter, who most recently proved that he has an extraordinary gift for comedy with Oscar Straus’s operetta Die lustigen Nibelungen at the Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe, will be working with our International Opera Studio’s promising young ensemble. The musical direction will be in the hands of Antonino Fogliani, a Rossini specialist from Italy.

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