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Beethoven's fourth Piano Concerto

Konserthuset Stockholm: Stora SalenHötorget 8, Stockholm, 10387, Sweden
Dates/times in Stockholm time zone
Thursday 25 February 202119:00

The Chinese-American pianist Eric Lu (born in 1997) had a solid breakthrough in 2018, when he won first prize in the prestigious Leeds Piano Competition. But even before that, already in 2015 when he was only 17, he had also won the Chopin competition in Warsaw. 

Eric Lu now makes his debut with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra in Beethoven’s virtuoso Piano Concerto No. 4. In this music, Beethoven’s efforts to foster a new kind of interaction between the piano and orchestra is evident. The second movement has come to be particularly discussed, and is described as depicting Orpheus, a legendary musician in Greek mythology who tames wild beasts with his enchanting melodies.

The Danish conductor Thomas Dausgaard leads the orchestra. He is chief conductor of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. In Sweden he is recognised as the longtime leader of the Swedish Chamber Orchestra. He is also a frequent guest with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Dausgaard conducts music by the English composer Dorothy Howell (1898–1982). She had her breakthrough in 1919 with Lamia, the symphonic poem performed here. ”Who is this musical genious?”, surprised English critics asked themselves after the first performance. The music was inspired by a poem by Keats, with the same title. With her skillfulness with the orchestra she was soon nicknamed the ”English Strauss”. Once famed, she is now largely forgotten, but maybe that is about to change. 

”Symphonic poem” is also a justified description of Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, after Shakespeare’s play, although he himself called it a ”fantasy-ouverture”. The music was composed in 1869, in the time between the first and second symphonies, and it is by many considered his first true masterpiece. 

This concert will be live streamed. Click here to watch.

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