Anna Karenina

This listing is in the past
OpernhausFalkenstrasse 1, Zürich, 8008, Switzerland
2016 September 22 19:30, September 30 19:00, 2017 January 15 19:30, January 18 19:00, January 20 20:00, January 21 18:00, February 22 19:00, February 25 19:00, March 01 19:00, June 28 19:00, July 01 19:00
Performers
Paul ConnellyConductor
Christian SpuckSet Designer
Emma RyottCostume Designer
Jörg ZielinskiSet Designer
Zurich Junior Ballet
Philharmonia Zürich
Judith SchmidMezzo-soprano
Adrian OetikerPiano
Deniz UzunMezzo-soprano
Katja WünscheDancer
William MooreDancer
Giulia TonelliDancer

The beautiful Anna Karenina is living in a joyless marriage with an austere, highly respected government official in St. Petersburg. When Anna encounters the happy-go-lucky officer Count Vronsky, she falls in love with him at first sight, but is initially reluctant to embark on an affair. Vronsky woos her until she becomes his secret lover. The amour fou doesn’t remain a secret for long, and society ostracises the adulteress. Anna, caught between her moral duty as a wife and love, is in despair. The catastrophe takes its course. With Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy wrote a novel of world stature. He not only tells the story of a love affair that founders due to prevailing moral attitudes, but also presents a subtle, panoramic view of Russian society in the late 19th century. In Tolstoy’s opulent portrayal of social mores, the upright landowner Levin and Kitty, the daughter of a St. Petersburg prince, are the antithesis of Anna and Vronsky. Their relationship is not dominated by passion, but by a sense of responsibility, sincerity and tenderness, and finds its fulfilment in a contented life in the country.

Christian Spuck has adapted this demanding novel as a ballet, and in so doing has thrilled not only audiences in Zurich, but also in Oslo. His interpretation of Anna Karenina is even soon to be premiered in Moscow. Christian Spuck focuses on the fate of the heroine, but also explores the way of life of the other principal characters. To the accompaniment of symphonic and chamber music by Sergei Rachmaninoff and Witold Lutoslawski, he translates the fate of Tolstoy’s protagonists into vivid choreographic images.

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