Nuestra política de privacidad se actualizó por última vez el lunes 24 junio 2019Consultar aquíEliminar
Bachtrack logo
Home
Programación
Críticas
Artículos
Video
Site
Inicio conciertos
EventosCríticasArtículos

Pictures at an Exhibition

MapaComprar
Konzerthalle Bamberg: Joseph Keilberth SaalMußstr. 1, Bamberg, Bayern, 96047, Alemania
El domingo 2 febrero 2020 at 17:00
Programa
Mussorgsky, Modest Petrovich (1839-1881)Cuadros de una exposición (Arr. Grigory Gruzman)
Shostakovich, Dmitri (1906-1975)Symphony no. 15 in A major, arranged for piano trio and percussion, Op.141a
Intérpretes
Vladislav PopyalkovskyViolín
Marius UrbaViolonchelo
Holger BrustPercusión
Robert CürlisTimbales
Jens HerzPercusión
Gleb KoroleffPiano

In his famous cycle “Pictures at an Exhibition” of 1874, Mussorgsky created an inspired musical monument to his friend, the painter Viktor Hartmann, who had died one year previously. In this imaginative suite, Mussorgsky set Hartmann’s drawings and images to enchanting music in a veritable creative frenzy: “Sounds and ideas hover in the air, I swallow them and become overfull, scarcely managing to scribble it all down on paper.” The result was music for both eyes and ears – with wonderful images of a limping gnome, a lumbering ox cart, children playing and fighting, nagging gossips in the market square and the ballet of the unhatched chicks. In our chamber concert, we will perform this popular piece in the fascinating version for piano trio, which explores the composition’s profound aspects in its very own way. The adaptation of the second Russian masterpiece is no less exciting: Shostakovich wrote his Symphony no. 15 in 1971, partly in hospital due to “trouble with my heart”. At the time, he was turning away from the world more and more. In his last symphony, he left behind a cryptic review of a composer’s life full of highs and lows – and a nostalgic foray through musical history. He quotes not only from his own works, but from those of other composers: there are flashes of motifs from Rossini’s “William Tell” overture and the operas of Richard Wagner. On a superficial level, the symphony appears to be quite carefree – but this impression is deceptive, and at the end the music ticks away like a clock running down.

Mobile version