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Organ and Violoncello

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Konzerthalle Bamberg: Joseph Keilberth SaalMußstr. 1, Bamberg, Bayern, 96047, Allemagne
Le dimanche 22 mars 2020 at 17:00
Artistes
Iveta ApkalnaOrgue
Matthias RanftVioloncelle

The Latvian Iveta Apkalna is an exceptional character within the world of music and especially within the idiosyncratic organ music scene. She has captivated audiences worldwide and is now returning to Bamberg for the second time. Her repertory always includes new discoveries from the classical modern era. In this concert, she will thus present a work by her fellow countryman Pēteris Vasks, who once said: “Today, most people no longer have any faith, love or ideals. We have lost our spiritual side. I want to nourish the soul. This is what I preach in my works.” The rich tones of his 1988 “Evening Music” exude a dreamy magic. Saint-Saëns dedicated his “Marche héroïque” to the memory of his friend Henri Regnault, who was killed in 1871 on the battlefield near Paris. Thus the defiant main theme, with its lively march tempo, gives way to profoundly nostalgic passages. Bach’s multifaceted “Pièce d’Orgue” of 1710, the Fantasia BWV 572, constitutes a thrilling pinnacle of his oeuvre: an extensive, strictly five-part and solemn middle section is framed by a lively toccata and a fantasia. As an organist in Paris, the 19th-century composer César Franck was well versed in all the possible sounds the instrument could produce and once said: “Mon orgue? – C‘est un orchestre!” In his works “Prélude, fugue et variations” and “Pièce héroïque”, Franck produced some epic tone paintings. The understanding of the organ as an entire orchestra also formed the basis of many compositions by Charles-Marie Widor, who likewise was an organist in Paris. His famous organ symphony of 1879 pulls out all the stops to create a brilliant, rapturous rush of music, building veritable cathedrals of sound.

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