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Composer: Gerhard, Roberto (1896-1970)

Fact file
Year of birth1896
Year of death1970
NationalityUnknown
Period20th century
November 2018
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Evening performance
Matinee performance
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BarcelonaTrío Pedrell: Robert Gerhard

Trío Pedrell: Robert Gerhard
Gerhard, Pedrell
Trío Predell, String Trio

BarcelonaEl Tercero de Rachmaninov con Barry Douglas

© Katya Kraynova
Rachmaninov, Gerhard
Orquestra Simfònica de Barcelona i Nacional de Catalunya; Josep Caballé-Domenech; Barry Douglas

MadridLa peste / Britten requiem / Les illuminationsNew production

La peste / Britten requiem / Les illuminations
Britten, Gerhard
Orquesta Titular del Teatro Real; Juanjo Mena; Coro Titular del Teatro Real; Toby Spence; Justin Way; Dora Garcia
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Miloš Karadaglić wows Amsterdam audience

Miloš Karadaglić © Margaret Malandruccolo | DG
Milos Karadaglić, one of the world's leading guitarists, entertains an enthusiastic Amsterdam audience in a programme of Bach and Spanish favourites. 
*****
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The art of fear, or the fear of art? The Rest is Noise with Karim Said

Karim Said  ©  Aiga Ozo
This Sunday, pianist Karim Said returned to the Southbank Centre to put Arnold Schoenberg under the microscope for a third and last time. Performing as part of the International Piano Series 2012/13 and the cataclysmic Rest is Noise festival, Said’s concerts have focused on the genesis of the Second Viennese School.
*****
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Crouch End Festival Chorus Proves Chilling and Brilliant

Marco Borggreve
Saturday night at the Barbican Centre was anything but ordinary. Performing two works by composers John Adams and Roberto Gerhard, the Crouch End Festival Chorus (CEFC) and London Orchestra da Camera, conducted by David Temple, achieved harmonic brilliance and chilling dissonance in a single evening. The first half of the night was devoted to John Adams’ Harmonium.