Bachtrack logo

Composer: Visée, Robert de (1660-1725)

Fact file
Year of birth1660
Year of death1725
NationalityUnknown
PeriodBaroque
May 2018
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
04050607080910
Evening performance
Matinee performance
Upcoming eventsSee more...

LondonThe Bach Players: Pour le Souper du Roi

Couperin, Visée, Marais, Jacquet de la Guerre, Forqueray, Rameau
The Bach Players; Nicolette Moonen; Robert Smith (viola da gamba); Linda Sayce

AmsterdamOn the Spot: baroque to jazz

On the Spot: baroque to jazz
Heredia, Visée, Rossi, Davis, Vloeimans, van Kesteren, van Veenendaal, Azmeh
Calefax; Eric Vloeimans
Latest reviewsSee more...

All the evenings of the world

Jordi Savall © Teresa Llordes
Jordi Savall's returns to 1991 film soundtrack and captivates a full house at St John's Smith Square.
*****
Read more

Lutenist Miguel Yisrael Makes an Auspicious American Debut

Miguel Yisrael © Jean-Baptiste Millot
Solo lute concerts of this repertoire, or lute recitals of any kind for that matter, are rare on this side of the Atlantic. Lucky audiences in Philadelphia heard an exceptional recital of French lute repertoire by Paris-based lutenist Miguel Yisrael.
****1
Read more

Savall in Madrid

Jordi Savall
It seems unfair to describe this as a Jordi Savall concert, when in fact Xavier Díaz-Latorre, introduced as his collaborator, played at least as fundamental a role and provided some of the most memorable moments of the evening.
***11
Read more

Rolf Lislevand delivers an evening of uplifting early Baroque music at Brussels' Protestant Chapel

Rolf Lislevand  ©  Francesca Pfeffer
Most musicians with an arresting stage presence tend to command attention with an awe-inspiring magnetism. There are, however, a handful who possess a rare ability to mesmerize an audience just as much with a calm and phlegmatic demeanour.
****1
Read more

Fêtes Galantes: Musical Gallantry at Wigmore Hall

Sophie Daneman  © Sandra Lousada and Ian Bostridge © Ben Eagolvea
‘Fêtes Galantes’ is one of those glorious French phrases that sounds so wonderful but is nigh on impossible to translate. Rather than having any concrete meaning, it evokes Watteau-esque imagery of woodland gatherings, where eighteenth-century aristocrats amuse themselves by flirting, dancing and making music.
****1
Read more