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Performer: Andrew Armstrong

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SeattleDvorak, Chopin, and Rachmaninov

© Ken Dundas Photography
Dvořák, Chopin, Rachmaninov
Erin Keefe; Augustin Hadelich; Richard Yongjae O'Neill; Edward Arron

SeattleBeethoven, Enescu, Kodaly, Boulanger, and Strauss

© Ken Dundas Photography
Beethoven, Enescu, Kodály, Boulanger, Strauss R.
James Ehnes; Andrew Armstrong; Amy Schwartz Moretti; Richard Yongjae O'Neill

SeattleSchubert, Poulenc, and Brahms

© Ken Dundas Photography
Schubert, Poulenc, Brahms
Augustin Hadelich; Jonathan Vinocour; Cameron Crozman; Ben Hausmann

AmsterdamJames Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong: Beethoven

© Benjamin Ealovega
Beethoven
James Ehnes; Andrew Armstrong
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A modest virtuoso: James Ehnes at Wigmore Hall

James Ehnes © Benjamin Ealovega
How do violinists devise their recital programmes? The conventional format has been to choose a violin sonata from each musical era, or to focus on a particular composer or national style.
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A gorgeous chamber music première in Seattle

Steven Stucky © Hoebermann
Framed by passionate performances of Mendelssohn and Brahms, a gorgeous neo-Romantic work by Steven Stucky is unveiled in this installment of the 2015 Summer Festival. 
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Metropolitan Museum Artists bring Adams and Dvořák to life

The loosely-affiliated Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert, now in its ninth season at the museum, illustrates all that is good about music-making among friends – and even family members. Two sets of siblings and numerous old friends were on stage for a concert of music inspired by the completion of the museum’s new wing of American art.
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A Model Recital

Choosing a programme for a recital is as important and nearly as difficult as all the practice that happens next. The programme must be the perfect length, provide a contrast of musical styles and yet be linked in some way so as not to be arbitrary.