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Hampstead Garden Opera presents Handel's, Semele

This listing is in the past
Upstairs at the GatehouseHighgate Village, London, Greater London, N6 4BD, United Kingdom
Dates/times in London time zone
Performers
HGO
Oliver-John RuthvenConductor
James HurleyDirector
Musica Poetica
Elaine TateSopranoSemele2011 Apr 08
Kathryn WalkerSopranoJuno
Melanie SandersMezzo-sopranoIno2011 Apr 08
Daisy BrownSopranoIris2011 Apr 08
Andrew TippleBassSomnus2011 Apr 08
Zachary DevinTenorJupiter
Dominic KraemerBassCadmus2011 Apr 08
Robyn Allegra PartonSopranoSemele2011 Apr 13
Catherine BackhouseMezzo-sopranoIno2011 Apr 13
Tom VerneyCountertenorAthamas2011 Apr 13
Bartholomew LawrenceBassSomnus2011 Apr 13
Samuel PantcheffBassCadmus2011 Apr 13
Rebecca MoonSopranoIris2011 Apr 13
Ed BonnerTenorApollo2011 Apr 13
Martin MusgraveBassHigh Priest2011 Apr 13
Semele loves Jupiter, not wisely but too well. His jealous wife Juno deploys all her armoury of tricks to spoil the party, with dire consequences for the naïve girl.

Hot on the heels of directing HGO’s sell-out production of The Magic Flute, James Hurley returns to Upstairs at the Gatehouse with an inventive new production of Handel’s Semele. "I want us to tell the story of Semele as clearly as we can” says Hurley. “Handel's opera-oratorio provides us with a rich mix of mortal and immortal characters, in settings that range from earth to heaven, and all places in between. I needed to find a way of showing this diversity of character and space in a way that plays to the strengths of the theatre’s intimate and inclusive environment for opera performance. The disused, dust-sheeted environment of the backstage of a theatre seemed an intriguing place to start; an empty, hollow representation of immortality, which nevertheless brims with the possibility of life amidst all its disused performance artefacts. In this environment I felt we could show the gods in their element from the start - delighting and horrifying each other, as they stage-manage the mortal world in their midst."
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