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Venue: Lincoln Center, New York City

Fact file
Address165 W. 65th Street
New York City
NY 10023
United States
ContainsLincoln Center, Rose Building: Daniel and Joanna S. Rose Studio
Alice Tully Hall
Clark Studio Theater
David Geffen Hall
David H Koch Theater
Fordham University, 12th Floor Lounge
Metropolitan Opera House
New York State Theater
Rose Theater
Stanley H Kaplan Penthouse
Walter Reade Theater
Google maps40° 46' 26.830" N 73° 59' 2.841" W
June 2019
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Evening performance
Matinee performance
Upcoming eventsSee more...

New York CityMark Morris Dance Group

Satie, Ives, Schumann
Mark Morris; Mark Morris Dance Group; Colin Fowler; Georgy Valtchev; American String Quartet

New York CityThe Magic Flute

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute)
Louis Langrée; Barrie Kosky; Komische Oper Berlin; Esther Bialas; Julien Behr; Aaron Blake

New York CityEroica Symphony

Beethoven
Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra; Andrew Manze; Vilde Frang

New York CityA Little Night Music: Kian Soltani

Vali, Chopin, Schumann, Soltani, Popper
Kian Soltani; Julio Elizalde

New York CityA Little Night Music: Michael Brown

Mendelssohn, Brown, Beethoven
Michael Brown, Piano

New York CityThe Four Seasons

Bartók, Vivaldi
Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra; Andrew Manze; Knut Sundquist; Pekka Kuusisto

New York CityA Little Night Music: Nora Fischer & Marnix Dorrestein

Scarlatti, Purcell, Monteverdi, Ravel
Nora Fischer; Marnix Dorrestein

New York CityA Little Night Music: Pekka Kuusisto & Knut Erik Sundquist

Pekka Kuusisto; Knut Sundquist
Latest reviewsSee more...

Wildly offensive, but wildly entertaining too: ABT's Le Corsaire

Skylar Brandt in Le Corsaire © Rosalie O’Connor
Perhaps ABT's disclaimer in the program notes should have simply said: "When you watch Le Corsaire, prepare to be both offended and entertained. We hope you'll be more entertained than offended."
****1
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ABT's damp, dreary Jane Eyre disappoints

Devon Teuscher and James Whiteside © Gene Schiavone
If you love Jane Eyre, stick to the novel. There's more female empowerment in those pages than in Cathy Marston's choreography.
**111
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ABT pays tribute to a ballet maverick

The Brahms-Haydn Variations © Marty Sohl
As the wonderful Tharp trio program proves, all these years later Twyla Tharp can still make ballet look cool.
****1
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Dreamy Midsummer ends NYCB's spring season

Teresa Reichlen (Titania) © Paul Kolnik
Yet the audience loved it, just as they love every performance of A Midsummer's Night DreamI've ever attended. This ballet is a tribute to Shakespeare, a tribute to love, a tribute to dance. One walks out feeling as if one's "soul is in the sky."
****1
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Van Zweden brings back Corigliano's remarkable First Symphony

Jaap van Zweden conducts the New York Philharmonic © Steven Pisano for Bachtrack
A quarter century after its New York première, Corigliano’s Symphony no. 1 has maintained its emotional impact. 
****1
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Ratmansky triple bill celebrates ten years with ABT

Summer from The Seasons © Marty Sohl
The Seasons is overstuffed, uneven and way too busy. There are so many steps, but they rarely made me "see the music". It was a frustrating ballet, with so many lovely moments that were less than the sum of its parts.
****1
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Ratmansky's Harlequinade reconstruction already showing its age

Isabella Boylston and James Whiteside in Harlequinade © Rosalie O’Connor
Harlequinade shows Ratmansky's usual scrupulous care when reconstructing Petipa's ballets. His attention to detail and obvious love for the art form are to be admired. But these ballets are also living, breathing works and they need strong performances to be viable in the repertory.
***11
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NYCB's eclectic program worth the three hours

Harrison Ball in Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes © Erin Baiano
The ending of Stars and Stripesis a sure-fire applause machine. The lowering of the flag while all the regiments march and salute onstage is so corny that only Balanchine could have choreographed it with a straight face. And yet it worked in 1958 and it works in 2019. 
*****
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